The Raven Cycle Reread: 2.10

Summary:

At this point all I do is apologize for posting updates late, and I’m tired of it! Especially when it pertains to self-imposed deadlines about a passion project that I’m only doing because I couldn’t find it anywhere else on the internet. Chapter updates will come when they come, and this will be the last one until at least Monday because I’m going on a class trip to Yeats country this weekend and will be too busy hearing about Innisfree 30 million times to think about Maggie Stiefvater and her creations.

But, anyways. Back to the book.

Gansey hung up the phone at the end of last chapter, but somehow he’s back on it, talking to Adam again. He wants Adam to come with him to some fundraising party his mother is throwing, since Adam might find a political internship or something equally as snakey to do with his time. Gansey’s trying to placate Adam’s confusing rules about when he is and isn’t allowed to accept help while also unrolling an enormous satellite map of Henrietta, and it’s proving difficult, to say the least.

For some weird reason, though, everything seems to be going okay at Monmouth. Adam agrees to go to the party, Gansey gets his map pressed flat, Ronan and Noah are dropping expensive things out of second floor windows. And then, as if that wasn’t good enough, Adam asks Gansey for help with Blue. Specifically her whole hang-up on kissing—why won’t she do it? Is it Adam? Has she talked to Gansey at all, and if she hasn’t, could Gansey bring up the subject gracefully and see what’s up?

“I’m really bad at talking, Gansey,” Adam said earnestly. “And you’re really good at it. Maybe—maybe if it just comes up natural?”

I don’t know if you remember, but in the last book Blue and Gansey had a conversation that seemed to be about nothing but kissing. Gansey has the whole story but it’s a secret story that’s not his to tell. He does his best to skirt around the definition of a lie, but it would be a really bad idea to say “yes we’ve talked about it but no I’m not telling you what she said” to your emotionally vulnerable and deeply insecure friend. It would actually transcend really bad and be firmly in the realm of disastrous.

And also, Gansey has a very obvious thing for Blue, and it’s hard for teenage boys to rationalize those feelings. And Gansey still is a teenage boy, no matter how many times he’s described as being an old man. And then there’s this:

“Well, she’s not really like a girl. I mean, sure, she’s a girl. But it’s not like when I was dating someone. It’s Blue. 

Oh, Gansey. This is going to pose such a problem in the future.

The rest of the chapter is consumed with Noah’s righteous anger at being thrown out the window by Ronan (“you’re already dead!”) and questions of whether or not Adam has a red tie to wear to Gansey’s mother’s fundraiser. It’s all very short, and sweet, and it makes me wary. What’s going to explode next?

Thoughts and Feelings:

Although I have to be at the train station in an hour and am therefore glad this chapter was short, I don’t really understand why it wasn’t rolled into the previous one?

Like, okay, I get that Dollar City was a setting for a phone call touched by magic. And this call is distinctly non-magical; in fact, it pertains to everything that I forgot was going on in the Gangsey’s lives because I was too focused on the magic. But it’s suspended in time. I have no idea when this chapter takes place. Is it the same night? Is it several days later? It feels like you could pick up these four pages and plunk them anywhere else in the novel and they’d work just fine.

And I’m not saying I don’t understand the impulse to put them in. I totally get it! I, too, love the background noise of Ronan and Noah breaking expensive things for fun, and who wouldn’t want to throw their dead friend out a window? But to have a cliffhanger (stated by Noah, of all people) lead into a chapter like this is distinctly unsatisfying. It leaves the same taste in my mouth as a chapter about the Gray Man does: okay, that was nice, now what?

I’m not denying the fact that towards the end of the book I’ll be begging for chapters like these. I’ll be like, “boo hoo, where are soft moments with my boys where things are cute and Ronan is engaging in destruction of property?” But for now, I’m spoiled and I want something different.

So apologies for such lackluster thoughts, but I’m only as good as my source material. It was nice, but nothing special.

Best Character Moment:

Blue was a fanciful but sensible thing, like a platypus, or one of those sandwiches that had been cut into circles for a fancy tea party.

Best Turn of Phrase:

Once, he had dreamt that he found Glendower. It wasn’t the actual finding, but the day after. He wouldn’t forget the sensation of the dream. It hadn’t been joy, but instead, the absence of pain. He couldn’t forget that lightness. The freedom.

Action: I said it once and I’ll say it again: Noah gets thrown out of a window!!! 5/10

Magic: Absolutely none, except that Noah doesn’t die upon defenestration. 2/10

Comic Relief: A soft kind of funny that I was mad at but have come to appreciate. 6/10

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