The Raven Cycle Reread: 2.12

Summary:

In the beginning of this chapter, for an exceptionally lovely page and a half, we are thrust back into 300 Fox Way. It’s been so long that I almost forgot what their house number was, which is a travesty. I promise it will never happen again.

But, as things go at Fox Way, this is a pretty quiet morning. We’re mostly concerned with Blue’s summer reading and its subsequent interruption as her Aunt Jimi comes in to smudge the room. I didn’t know what that was, but I quickly found out it’s when you burn bundles of herbs and then walk around to cleanse somewhere of bad energy. The bad energy we’re getting rid of today is Neeve’s, because unlike the reader, the occupants of Blue’s house haven’t forgotten that she was doing bad witchy stuff very recently.

Now Jimi waved the lavender and sage in Blue’s face. “Sacred smoke, cleanse the soul of this young woman before me and give her some common sense.”

Blue is waiting for Adam and Gansey to come over and leaves the smokiness of her room, fully preparing to wait for them out there, when she realizes the attic door has been left open. What teenager wouldn’t be inclined to snoop, with an invitation like that? Blue goes upstairs.

She finds that everything has been packed away and shoved to the side except for Neeve’s mirrors and her scrying bowl, which looks like it’s been recently used. That doesn’t make sense, not only because Neeve has been gone for months, but because scrying is dangerous and the women of Fox Way have been sufficiently warned against it. We are (not so subtly) posed the question: who’s scrying? And what are they looking for?

We then switch point-of-view to a nice little flashback where Ronan explains how he once saw the devil. This isn’t a joke, or a fun little metaphor where he describes the human cruelty he’s been witness to. No, Ronan Lynch saw his father shoot a red, horned being in the head. What he called the devil then showed Niall its genitalia and then left.

I’m not entirely sure what to make of this story, except to tell you all that it’s supposed to serve as an explanation for why Ronan is religious and transition to a scene in St. Agnes, with Noah and all three Lynch brothers.

It was the devil who drove him to church every Sunday, but it was his brother Matthew who drove him to a pew beside Declan.

Declan looks terrible. We know why he looks terrible; remember when he got the shit kicked out of him in chapter two? But he doesn’t tell Ronan everything, instead saying it’s a burglary and refusing to say anything more about it. Ronan’s a little jealous; he’s definitely of the fun sibling mentality that dictates nobody but him can beat up his brothers.

That sweet bonding moment is interrupted when Declan, acting with no tact (as per usual), tells Ronan that Kavinsky isn’t Lynch Family Approved and they should stop hanging around each other. Even if there wasn’t gay tension there, Ronan would still have a right to be pissed, but you can see how the setting might up the tension. Catholic church, estranged brother telling you not to talk about the boy you dreamed a present for the night before—it’s a lot to take in.

Sometimes, Declan seemed to think that being a year older gave him special knowledge of the seedier side of Henrietta. What he meant was, did Ronan know that Kavinsky was a cokehead?

In his ear, Noah whispered, “Is crack the same thing as speed?”

Ronan didn’t answer. He didn’t think it was a very church-appropriate conversation.

When church is over and they all leave, we get a wonderful cameo from Declan’s-smart-girlfriend-Ashley, who fights with Ronan and acknowledges the church as an institution is oppressive to women (thank you, Ashely, you underappreciated bottle-blonde goddess). Ronan is having none of this and leaves to look for a street race. Which is to say, he leaves to look for Kavinsky and the spiritual satisfaction he didn’t find at church.

I’m going to gloss over this part, because I know that Stiefvater loves cars but I just don’t know anything about them. Descriptions of souped-up whatevers and loud mufflers just confuses me. Let’s just say that Ronan knows how to find a car with which to race, and that takes the kind of Rich Boy Car Knowledge that he and Kavinsky have in spades.

Noah and Ronan drive in the direction of Kavinsky’s house. Kavinsky shows up in his Mitsubishi, calls Ronan a fag, and then pretends to get offended when he’s called a Russian in return. I realize that I truly do not understand teenage boys, and thank God for that.

Ronan wins the street race. For one second, he is happy. It’s a new experience for the both of us.

Thoughts and Feelings:

These new-fangled chapters with their multiple locations and diversified plot structures are really throwing me for a loop. It feels like years since we were smudging Blue’s room with her Aunt Jimi! Granted, that makes sense, as any church service also seemed to me, in childhood, to take several years, but still. Wow.

We got to meet Matthew for the first time, which is nice. There’s a gratuitous description of his dimples (which makes sense in a couple books when you learn more about the Lynch family structure) and he turns down the church wine which is very adorable and wholesome for a boarding school boy. Declan and Ronan make a lot of angry noises at one another, which makes sense with what we know of their characters.

I was a bit startled by the throwback to Neeve and her mysterious disappearance, because she feels so irrelevant now. It’s also well-within my moral code to just write her off. She messed with stuff she shouldn’t have messed with—she deserves to be gone! Anybody who had a healthy appetite for reading as a kid knows that’s what happens to villains. They don’t die, because killing is ~wrong~, but they deserve whatever odd punishment is granted them.

I wasn’t so much startled by all the anger that was floating around the church. This is Ronan’s book, so seeing what he does on the weekends is inevitable. It was a motley crew, though, there’s no denying that. Ronan, Noah, Declan, Matthew, and then Kavinsky. In hindsight I have to say I’m glad Blue was there to balance it all out.

I’m excited for this to move forward, though. Blue dropped the hint that she’s waiting for Adam and Gansey, Ronan is angry and ready to mess some shit up for everyone, and Noah is being proactive about the state of his soul. It’s pretty much all I can ask for as we transition to figuring out what the hell is going on with Cabeswater and where Glendower is sleeping. If we ever do, in fact, find out either of those things (don’t worry guys, I’ve read the series. We do find them out. It just takes a couple more books).

I’m going to stop rambling and go to the highlights now.

Best Character Moment:

A lady reached over the top of Noah to pat Matthew’s head fondly before continuing down the aisle. She didn’t seem to care that he was fifteen, which was all right, because he didn’t, either. Both Ronan and Declan observed this interaction with the pleased expressions of parents watching their prodigy at work.

Best Turn of Phrase:

And so Ronan became a reverse evangelist. The truth burst and grew inside him, and it was laid upon him to share it with no one.

Action: As street races go, this one took place after a house-cleaning and Catholic mass. Not all that exciting. 5/10

Magic: I personally hated the magic we were presented in this chapter, which was the red devil that Ronan saw with his father. It felt superfluous and creepy for no reason. 2/10

Comic Relief: Man oh man does Matthew provide relief from the tension between his older brothers. But how funny was it, really? 6/10

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